Jenny Peterson, Merge, 2015, Intaglia and relief, 49 x 43 cm image size, Latrobe Regional gallery Collection , Acquired 2015
Image Credit: Jenny Peterson, Merge, 2015, Intaglia and relief, 49 x 43 cm image size, Latrobe Regional gallery Collection , Acquired 2015​.
Jenny Peterson, Helmet, 2002, Etching and Aquatint, 55 x 40 cm, Latrobe Regional Gallery Collection, Acquired 2002
Image Credit:Jenny Peterson, Helmet, 2002, Etching and Aquatint, 55 x 40 cm, Latrobe Regional Gallery Collection, Acquired 2002

LRG IN CONVERSATION

Jenny Peterson

 

Local artist and printmaker Jenny Peterson talks to LRG Senior Curator David O’Halloran about her practice and her process in this one on one conversation from the Works on Paper store at Latrobe Regional Gallery.

Jenny Peterson is represented by James Makin Gallery in Melbourne, and she also delivers workshops in etching, monoprints, collagraphs and nature printing. Her art process investigates the art of collecting, often using found objects as printing plates to explore their material qualities. Peterson aims to reveal and re-present something of the history of the objects, and they become a new collection of off-site markers.

 

 
ROAD SIGNS AND FOUND METAL SERIES

Jenny Peterson collects broken road signs and other found objects during road trips in the local region. Scratched and dented metal surfaces are fixed as traces of memory into soft paper. Signage techniques are mimicked by gathering and printing words about collecting, the souvenir and the journey.
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TIN SUIT SERIES

Tin Suit is a collection of prints and drawings, combining cardboard, corrugated iron and paper to investigate the mythology surrounding rural heroes – the farmer and the bush ranger. Tin Suit is about impressions, but not in the sense of the art movement. Impressions of rural Victoria are present, through references to landscape and farming icons, and there is the impression that erosion has marked the surfaces (land and metal) through time and climate, and the impression of tin pressing into soft paper, wrapping around soft flesh. In colours that are meant to be indicative of landscape and the elements (earth, fire, air, water), the shapes of iron exist between body and environment. The patina of rust oxidised corrugations is at once timeless and iconic, but at the same time suggests something aged and worn – the history of the country.
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Latrobe Regional Gallery's Education and Public Programs are generously supported by Australian Paper